Reviews and References

2016





Jaangle’s looks are superior with a lot of built-in options to customize it to your liking. Along with a number of colorization options to ease or dazzle your eyes, as well as the library viewing options you can basically create your own player. You can select which panes you want to see, their size and where you want to see them. There’s also a mini-mode for those who prefer to have Jaangle heard, but not seen.

For those who don’t feel like creating playlists, just play a song. If you do nothing, Jaangle’s auto DJ mode will randomly go through your .mp3 files. It’s like a radio DJ who knows all of your favorite songs and plays them all the time. The library is where Jaangle separates itself from the competition. It displays small thumbnails of every album in your collection along with the artist’s picture and bio that it automatically downloads from the internet. Should Jaangle be unable to find the artist you can also manually insert or change the photos and bios. Right clicking on a song will bring up an option to download its lyrics.

A note of mocking laughter rang out when I saw the three-band equalizer, but it is surprising effective, more so than many 18-band equalizers I’ve used. There’s also an adjustable cross fading control. Click them off and automatic digital signal processing takes over for optimum sound.

While you can edit tags manually in Jaangle, extended tags cannot be edited. Just like any of the reviewed players, proper tagging, before you load up the library, is essential to your sanity and can reap many rewards. Seemingly, insignificant differences in entries can wreak havoc. Example: having or not having the decimal point in .38 Special will cause these items to be listed on opposite ends of the library. This looks like another motivation for using a separate tag editor. (Psst! You didn’t hear it here, but I use a program called MP3Tag. You can find it at Best Free MP3 Tag Editor.)

And here’s a first for ANY music player. You’ll notice a little icon on the top toolbar called “Games”. If you click on it, you’ll be presented with a “Name That Tune” type trivia game based upon the music in your library.

With all its features, Jaangle is the personification of a music player and organizer.

2011

SnapFiles
Editor’s Rating 5 stars
User Rating 5(18) 
Popularity 6 6
XP/Vista/7/8/10

Jaangle is a media player and organizer that stands out of the crowd with a user friendly interface and easy access to some of the most Rated 5 stars at SnapFilespopular features such as cover downloads, lyrics retrieval, artist bio, personal ratings and more. It supports most video and audio formats including mp3, ogg, mp4 and many others.You can create multiple collections by simply adding the folder paths that contain your MP3 files, search through your collections and sort the file list in several ways. The program can automatically download lyrics, cover art and author bio (whenever available) and store the information locally, so it is available at any time, regardless of your Internet connection.Jaangle also keeps track of the files you play and lets you review statistics and generates a personal hit list based on which songs you listen to most. Other features include file renaming, ID3 editing, integrated player interface and more. A refreshing addition to the crowded media player/organizer market.Jaangle offers the right balance of features and an attractive interface that will suit most casual music listeners without much of a learning curve.

2009

I’ve got spurs that jingle, Jaangle, jingle… And my boots smell a lot like Teen Spirit. Okay, if you didn’t follow that, Teen Spirit–a free music organizer, player, and tag editor–is now known as Jaangle. Let’s hear it for snappy names…and for programming that won’t jangle your nerves in the least. Jaangle has found a home on my system simply because of its wide format support which includes MP3, AAC, WMA, 16-, 24-, 32-bit wave files at all resolutions, OGG, Flac, and even Apple Lossless–a rarity outside of iTunes.

When you import music into Jaangle it automatically reads the ID tags and downloads available album art and artist info from Amazon, LastFM, and Google. The interface–though skinnable–doesn’t have quite the stylish appearance of iTunes or even WMP, but it’s more usable and I liked the transparent mini-play that docks to the top of the screen. All functions are readily accessible within a single main window, and Jaangle stays away from multiple overlapping child windows. Everything is provided in paned windows which you can still show, hide, minimize, maximize or resize. My only suggestion to the developers is to replace the plus sign that invokes a dialog to add windows with a simple drop-down list.

One feature I truly enjoyed was the three-band equalizer. So many people mess up their sound using multi-band EQ, it’s a long-standing music industry cliché that if you want to generate business for a recording studio, just give away 12- or 24-band EQ units to potential clients. Bass, mid, and treble is all most users need if the curve and center points are musically adjusted by someone who knows what they are doing. Apparently, the Jaangle folks do. Everything sounds right.

Jaangle isn’t quite the eye candy some music players are. However, it’s free of charge, based on open source APIs, every bit as capable–and to my mind a lot more fun.

Note: This program is donationware. It is free to try, but the author accepts and encourages donations towards further development.

–Jon L. Jacobi

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